Two main signatures of DreamWorks Animation productions are frenetic action sequences and “adult” pop-tradition references. Not all their films intensely attribute both, though a lot of do — this is a studio that turned The Boss Infant, a fanciful children’s photo e book about sibling rivalry, into a yammering, scattered comedy with Glengarry Glen Ross references and, in its current sequel, an explosives-laden, remarkably damaging motor vehicle chase.

The new DreamWorks cartoon The Negative Men is also based on a series of children’s guides, and it appears to comply with a likewise noisy pattern: It has an opening scene derived from Pulp Fiction or something out of Steven Soderbergh, major straight into, of course, a raucous motor vehicle chase. And of program, Mr. Wolf (Sam Rockwell) will get the viewers up to velocity by addressing them immediately: What would DreamWorks motion pictures be without having narrated exposition in the 1st 10 minutes?

And yet, because this is a heist film, director Pierre Perifel knows it’s the particulars that subject. That opening scene, in which Mr. Wolf and his greatest good friend Mr. Snake (Marc Maron) chat in a diner about Mr. Snake’s hatred of birthdays and why guinea pigs style so good, doesn’t reference Pulp Fiction by whipping out “Misirlou” on the soundtrack or mentioning the Royale with Cheese. As an alternative, the scene will take its time, letting the people banter ahead of revealing, in a solitary animated “take,” that the diner staff’s and patrons have all been cowering off-display as the fearsome terrible guys finish having. The digital camera then follows Mr. Wolf and Mr. Snake across the road, the place they knock over a lender.

The freneticism of the ensuing car chase is leavened by the intentionally choppy, combine-and-match animation model. The characters’ models look vaguely a few-dimensional, but with easier, flatter eyes a much more paint-like texture for skin and fur and comedian ebook-esque graphic accents on their a lot more extraordinary motions. They glimpse drawn, alternatively than expensively rendered.

As with the additional grown-up heist films that precede it, the design goes a prolonged way toward enlivening a story that may feel familiar to cartoon lovers young and previous. Mr. Wolf and Mr. Snake are part of a infamous felony gang — also which includes Ms. Tarantula (Awkwafina), Mr. Piranha (Anthony Ramos), and Mr. Shark (Craig Robinson) — that at some point attempts to go straight. In other terms, these are negative fellas who are unexpectedly offered the possibility to improve on their own (like in Despicable Me) and split out of the villainous job that society assigned them (like in Wreck-It Ralph) based on the harmful stereotypes of their animal characteristics (like in Zootopia). This isn’t even the initial time DreamWorks has gone to this well its film Megamind functions a supervillain exploring his interior goodness.

Simply eradicating The Undesirable Men from a superhero/supervillain context, on the other hand, aids distinguish it from its numerous predecessors. Perifel actually does appear intrigued in producing a kid-helpful heist/caper picture, with all the downsides and twists that entails. Mr. Wolf experiences doubt more than regardless of whether he ought to carry on to pursue a lifetime of criminal offense, but when he initially convinces Governor Foxington (Zazie Beetz) to release his captured gang into the custody of identified philanthropist Professor Marmalade (Richard Ayoade) to be reformed, he has future heisting possibilities in mind. Other figures have key agendas of their personal.

These reversals and double-crosses are all established in a strange hybrid natural environment where human beings and some animals interact on equivalent social footing. (There are nevertheless smaller animals, like guinea pigs and kittens, who don’t speak or stroll upright.) This not entirely understood globe, where by aspect characters scarcely seem to be to exist exterior the qualifications of many capers, lends The Bad Guys an unpredictable whimsicality as it adapts heist roles for cartoon animals. Some of the improvements are intelligent (Mr. Snake sheds his pores and skin to swap outfits), and some are amusingly absurd (Mr. Shark, the biggest and minimum discreet of the team, is the designated master of disguise).

Mr. Shark and Mr. Wolf escape a massive explosion in The Bad Guys

Graphic: DreamWorks

The Undesirable Guys’ imitation of developed-up flicks is not often pitch-perfect. The makes an attempt at sly banter involving Mr. Wolf and Governor Foxington are just Ok — extra theoretically lovable than conversationally sharp. It goes down easy, however, with the playful insinuation of Rockwell’s distinctive vocal tones. (His dexterous real-daily life dance moves endure the changeover to animation, much too.) Maron also does great perform as the gruff, misanthropic Mr. Snake.

It’s all rather light-weight stuff, and following the latest mainstream triumphs like Turning Pink and Encanto from two distinctive arms of Disney, The Lousy Men may possibly nicely shore up DreamWorks’ position as the B-squad of modern day American animation, where by spectacle is the default and psychological advancement is a minimal pat. But the superior DreamWorks cartoons occur alive when they are liberated from Disney formulas, alternatively than chasing just after or self-consciously spoofing them. Even when The Bad Guys resembles other motion pictures, it is thieving from them gracefully, with its own sensibility and energy.

The Lousy Fellas debuts in theaters on April 22.